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Different Types Of Vegetable Cuts Used In Kitchen By Chef

There are different types of vegetable cuts used in culinary styles. Most of the vegetable cuts came from French Cuisine. Proper Cutting of vegetable plays important role in cooking of food. Good cutted of vegetables takes less time to cook and it’s crunchiness, flavour remains the same. This cuts are used by Chefs in Hotel Industry. Learn this different cuts here and try it at your home. This cuts definately improves the presentation of your dish.

It is a vegetable cut in which vegies are cut into small cubs of precise and uniform measurement. Brunoise is a French cooking term. Size of regular Brunoise is 3mm (1/8th Inch) and Fine Brunoise is 1.5mm (1/6th Inch). First cut the vegetable into rectangular/square shape by topping and tailing. Then cut 5mm long pieces then cut each of the piece into 4mm (1/8th Inch) i.e. Brunoise is ready. This cut is commonly used for Tomatoes, Potatoes, Carrots. This cut was popularized in the “Brunoy Commune”, which was 19km southeast of Paris.

● Macedoine:

This cut is a mixture of vegetables, fruits or both which are roughly chopped into small diced cubs of precise and uniform measurement. Macedoine is a French cooking term. Size of regular Macedoine is 0.5cm (5mm) which is larger than Brunoise. First cut the vegetable into rectangular/square shape by topping and tailing. Then cut long pieces then cut each of the piece into 5mm (0.5cm) i.e. Macedoine is ready. This cut is commonly used for Beans, Turnip, Carrots. The word “Macedoine” came from Macedoia north of Greece.

● Julienne:

It is a vegetable cut in which vegies are cut into stick shaped thin pieces of precise and uniform measurement. Julienne is a French cooking term. Size of regular Julienne is 4cm long in length. First cut the vegetable into long, thin strips. Then cut into 4cm long thin pieces i.e. Julienne is ready. Julienne cut is the smallest of it’s category of size around 1/16th or 1/1/8th of an inch. This cut is commonly used for Onion, Celery, Carrots. Cut Julienne as thin as you can. It takes less time to cook and looks very impressive.

● Jardiniere:

It is a vegetable cut in which vegies are cut into thikish baton of precise and uniform measurement. Jardiniere is a French cooking term. Size of regular Jardiniere is 2cm long in length and 3mm wide-thick. First cut the vegetable into rectangular/square shape by topping and tailing. Then cut 10cm long pieces then cut each of the piece into batons with a width of 3mm wide i.e. Jardiniere is ready. This cut is commonly used for Tomatoes, Potatoes, Carrots. In more recent times these are often slightly larger, but this depends on end of use.

● Paysanne:

Another cut based on Jardiniere, Paysanne is a wide, thin cut. It differs from Macedoine in that it isn’t a cube, but a thin slice. This cut may be either squares, triangles, circles or half rounds. It’s used when a chunkier texture is desired from small vegetable chunks that cook down quickly and release a lot of flavor. A Paysanne often used in Mirepoix, sautéed vegetables used as a base for sauces, soups, stocks, and anywhere else the veggies are needed for texture and flavor. Like Macedoine, Paysanne needs vegetables first cut Jardiniere. Then using a rock chop or a tap chop, cut the batons into thin slices, anywhere from 1mm to 5mm thick. All are cut thinly about 1 – 2 mm thick.

● Mirepoix:

A mixture of roughly chopped vegetables which are used as the base of sauces or to enhance the flavour of meat, fish and shellfish dishes.Normally onion, celery and carrot are used and these are slowly cooked in butter until they are very tender. Thyme and bay leaves are often added.

● Chateau/Turning:

Turning Vegetables. Cut tubalar vegetables into 5 cm (2 inch) lengths and round vegetables into chunks the same length and about 4 cm (1.5 inch) wide.

● Wedges/Section:

typical cut for fruit or vegetable has a round or oval shapes this course designed to give you an understanding of basic cutting and skills of vegetable that are key to your success in the

culinary industry

.

● Chiffonade/Shreded:

It’s is a cut specifically for leafy vegetables and herbs. It involves chopping the leaf into extremely thin slices. Each slice should be only about 1mm wide. Finely sliced or shredded green leafy vegetables, usually lettuce or spinach, which is used as a base, garnish or in soups. This cut is used to prepare herbs for seasoning, to chop veggies for a salad, or to make a light garnish. To make a chiffonade cut, place the leaves to be chopped in either a stack or rolled tightly. Then use a smooth rock chop to slice very thin strips. If this motion is new to you, it’s best to start off slowly to get a consistent size, and then speed up as you master the technique.

● Chopped:

simply cutting something into small, usually even, pieces. You need to chop vegetables, most often onions and garlic, for many different cooking techniques, including sautéing.

● Concasse:

Concasse, from the French concasser, “to

crush or

grind”, is a cooking term meaning to rough chop any ingredient, usually vegetables. This term is particularly applied to tomatoes, where tomato concasse is a tomato that has been peeled, seeded (seeds and skins removed), and chopped to specified dimensions. Specified dimensions can be rough chop, small dice, medium dice, or large dice.

● Matignon:

Roughly cut vegetables, normally including carrot, onion and celery, which are cooked in butter with ham, thyme and bay leaf. Cooking is finished by deglazing the pan with Madeira. Matignon vegetables are used to add flavour when cooking large pieces of meat. Thin even slices of vegetables used as a base to place the meat on when roasting.

● Slices:

Vegetables cut into similar size flat pieces. Can be lengthways or widthways, from 6mm/¼-inch to 2.5cm/1-inch thick.

● Segmen:

typically for fruit has a membrane such as citrus

● Mincing:

Mincing is a cutting food into
thin strips and them dice the strips. Very finely chopped.
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